My Pantry

Guide to Food Philosopher’s® Gluten-Free Flour Mixes

For Baking 

Authentic Foods GF Classic Blend (my brown rice flour mix already mixed up)
Extra finely ground brown rice flour (I only use Authentic Foods)
Extra finely ground sweet rice flour (I only use Authentic Foods)
Millet (I mostly use Bob’s Red Mill or Arrowhead Mills)
Sorghum (I use Bob’s Red Mill and Authentic Foods)
Potato starch (not potato flour)
Tapioca flour (also called tapioca starch)
Cornstarch
Teff flour (I use Bob’s Red Mill)
GF Oatmeal
GF Oat flour (I use Bob’s Red Mill)
Stone ground cornmeal
Granulated sugar
Dark brown sugar
Powdered buttermilk (I use Saco® Cultured Buttermilk Blend powder)
Xanthan gum (I use Bob’s Red Mill)
Guar gum

For Cooking
Many items listed require refrigeration after they are opened. Check label:

White rice
Brown rice
Arborio rice
Basmati rice
Assorted dried Italian-style pasta (I use Schar®, Le Veneziane®, Tinkyada® & Jovial™ )
Assorted Asian-style noodles (I mostly use Eden® 100% Buckwheat Soba, & Taste of Thai Rice® Noodles)
Assorted dry beans
Assorted favorite rice crackers

Iodized salt
Sea salt
Kosher salt
Whole black peppercorns
Whole mixed peppercorns
Ground black pepper

A variety of dried herbs and spices including: allspice, basil, bay leaf, cardamom, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, assorted chili powders, Chinese five-spice powder, whole cloves, ground cloves, coriander, crushed red pepper, cumin seeds and ground, curry, dill weed, fennel seed, dried mustard, ground ginger, nutmeg, oregano, paprika, red pepper flakes, rosemary, sage, saffron, tarragon, thyme leaves, ground thyme, turmeric

Beef, veal, and chicken glace and/or demi-glace (I use More than Gourmet®)
Concentrated fish glace (I use More than Gourmet®)
Bottled clam juice
Canned/containers of low-sodium chicken, beef and or vegetable broth
Red wine vinegar
White distilled vinegar
Rice wine vinegar
Apple cider vinegar
Balsamic vinegar

Canola oil
Extra virgin olive oil
Walnut oil
Sesame oil
Hot oil

Worcestershire sauce
Tamari/soy sauce
Hoisin sauce
Fish sauce
Red and white wine for cooking
Sherry, Port, Marsala wine for cooking
Sake and Plum wine for cooking
Honey
Molasses
Maple syrup
Favorite bottled salad dressings
Favorite bottled barbecue sauce

Canned whole tomatoes
Canned diced tomatoes
Canned crushed tomatoes
Canned tomato paste
Jars of your favorite pasta sauce
Canned red kidney, black and cannellini beans
Ketchup
Mayonnaise
Assorted mustards
Favorite bottled salsas

Assorted favorite relishes and pickles
Brine cured olives and oil cured olives
Capers

Canned pumpkin puree
Canned coconut milk
Assorted fruit preserves
Assorted dried fruits (raisins, apricots, currents)

Fresh garlic
Onions
Shallots

In My Refrigerator
Milk
Rice Milk
Heavy cream
Butter
Smart Balance ® Original with Flax
Eggs
Sour cream (usually high-quality reduced fat sour cream)
Assorted yogurts (typically non-fat Greek, and other low-fat yogurts)
Mayonnaise and Vegenaise®

Aged Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Other assorted cheeses – Montrachet, cheddar, jack cheese, etc.
Lemons and limes (grated zest can be stored in freezer)
Carrots
Celery
Bacon and pancetta (I store well-wrapped precut in freezer for soups, stews and bean dishes)

Prepared pesto (can be stored in freezer)
Bottled minced garlic
Assorted nuts -walnuts, almonds, pecans
Assorted fresh herbs

12 Responses to My Pantry

  1. jill mccrackekn says:

    I am enjoying perusing your information. I am wondering why you still use GM canola, really from the rapeseed plant and unfit for humans; let’s go non GMOs, please?

    • Annalise says:

      hi!
      Canola oil is available nationwide and isn’t ultra expensive. Gluten-free flours can be expensive and difficult to find. My goal is to create “classic” gluten-free baked goods with as many “normal” ingredients as possible as my first choice to make it easier for people. Canola oil is relatively flavorless and works well in gluten-free baked goods. That said, I do know know that some people do in fact use organic canola in my recipes, and some use grape seed oil (which may be a better choice for you).

      I’m not convinced that it is “unfit” for humans because I have never found a reliable, controlled study to prove it. I have however, read many internet sources that blast it without confirmable research. So I am not passing judgement – yet.

      Very best,
      Annalise

  2. Kim O'Donnell says:

    I really want to try your recipes and saw that Authentic Foods’ superfine rice flour was highly recommended. I emailed them a while back to ask if the rice was GMO and never got a response. Do you happen to know the answer?

    Thanks for your help.
    Kim

    • Annalise says:

      hi!
      Although I know that most of the soybeans and corn grown in this country are gmo, I’m not aware of whether any of the rice grown in California is (Authentic Foods buys their rice from California) . I will ask Steven Rice (the founder and president) and report back to you next week.

      Very best regards,
      Annalise

      UPDATE: Authentic Foods Brown Rice flour is NOT GMO.

  3. Brian Weiss says:

    Consider adding kasha (buckwheat) to your grain pantry. Despite its name, buckwheat is not wheat (kasha is the groats or hulled seeds of the buckwheat plant) and it is gluten-free. It’s a great and very tasty alternative to the blandness of white rice, it has a lot more flavor and better mouthfeel than quinoa, it has about a quarter fewer calories per cooked cup, and it cooks up quickly. I use Wolff’s, medium granulation, which is available at many supermarkets as well as Whole Foods and the other usual suspects.

    • Annalise says:

      hi!
      I actually like buckwheat, but I rarely eat cooked whole grains so I don’t actually have a whole grain pantry. I prefer to get my fiber and nutrients from other plants, nuts, seeds, and lean meat, fish and poultry. I also don’t eat much white rice, in fact, hardly ever– unless I’m making risotto, jambalaya, or Asian food (which isn’t often). That said, I think human bodies are all different and each of us has to feed our bodies what works for us. I don’t feel as good when I eat a lot of grain, but other people seem to (like every nutritionist I’ve ever met); I’m a big believer in listening to your own body and my body says not so much grain.

      Very best regards,
      Annalise

  4. Hardie Morgan says:

    Any recommendation for a substitute for powdered buttermilk for people who cannot do dairy?

    • Annalise says:

      hi!
      I haven’t found a powdered dairy version yet. I often recommend the powdered version because I don’t usually have real buttermilk in my refrigerator. It is a matter of convenience. But, if you’d want to make a diary free version of the buttermilk (powder) in my recipes, I’d recommend you simply make a liquid version and substitute it for the total amount of water and powder (or for real buttermilk, if it’s listed).

      The general formula is mix 1 cup dairy-free milk substitute (rice milk, etc) and 1 tablespoon lemon juice or distilled vinegar. Then, if the recipe calls for 1 cup buttermilk (or the powdered version: 1 cup water and 1/4 cup buttermilk powder), just make use 1 cup of the total amount.

      To make 1/2 cup buttermilk: 1/2 cup rice milk and 1 teaspoon lemon juice or distilled vinegar and use just 1/2 cup in the recipe (don’t worry about adding the extra 1/2 teaspoon vinegar, I’ve found it didn’t make a difference). Etc Etc.

      Hope this helps!
      Very best regards,
      Annalise

  5. Diane says:

    I’ve been using your Baking Classics book exclusively for 5 years now and have found nothing better! The Hazelnut cake and Maple Walnut cake are my birthday indulgences and I often get requests for them.

    The ONLY problem I’ve encountered is when I made the Chocolate Fudge cake, the centers sunk. Could you advise on what I might have done wrong?

    Thanks for improving the quality of my GF life!

    • Annalise says:

      hi!
      Yes, in my experience, the most common reason for the Chocolate Fudge Cake (and the German Chocolate Cake) to sink in the middle is that you may have inadvertently over-beaten it a bit too much; this has happened to me, my sister Claudia, and to others who have written me. Tying beating it a bit less than you normally would and see if that solves the problem. It has a heavier batter than my other layer cakes and is sensitive to getting over-lightened.

      More unlikely, but still possible, is that added you (also unintentionally) spooned the flour too lightly into the measuring cup and may need to add a tiny bit more (1 tablespoon).

      I’m very happy to hear that your are enjoying my recipes. The two cakes you mention are some of my family and friend’s absolute favorites and I also get requests for them. If you are on Facebook, I have a picture of the Hazelnut cake that I made for Christmas this year posted on my homepage.

      Very best regards,
      Annalise

  6. Mary says:

    Hi,
    I am really having trouble big time with the white sandwich bread, hot dog and hamburger buns when I am using your flour mix for them. They rise and then they fall. Or lately they do this all the time now, they rise up and look like huge giant pop overs and inside they are nothing but huge tunnels going throughout the bread. If I could show a picture of it I would. The bread is totally unusable even for croutons. I cannot figure out for the life of me what is going on, I have made gluten free breads before but non have ever come out like the “popover” they have all just fallen.
    What am I doing wrong
    I have make over and over the recipe reading and measuring extremely carefully and still the same results.

    Mary

    • Annalise says:

      hi!
      A couple questions: have you been making my breads for a long time and now all of a sudden they aren’t working well? And if yes, have you changed any of the flours, the xanthan gum or the yeast or the pans?

      What bread xanthan gum and yeast are you using? And what kind of pan?
      Could you possibly be spooning in the flour to lightly into the measuring cup?
      What kind of mixer do you have?

      A possible solution (if nothing else shows up from my questions above) is:
      Try making sure you don’t let the bread rise more than 1/2 inch from the top of the pan, and then, bake sandwich bread at 375ºF uncovered for 20 minutes and then cover with foil for 10 to 15 minutes more until internal temperature reaches 205ºF

      Very best,
      Annalise

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